THE COMPANY

Rostra Therapeutics will be a spin-out company from the University of Strathclyde, which is exploiting innovative drug discovery technology created in the Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry and the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science. The Rostra team of three scientists and two commercial leaders is supported by a virtual expert network allowing for the core team to remain small, and focussed on efficiently developing novel medicines.  Rostra Therapeutic's short to medium term goal is to develop the 2nd generation of S-MGBs through lead optimisation, up to pre-IND and onto phase I clinical development. Rostra Therapeutics has been founded to achieve this goal through its vision to:

 

‘Restore health and save lives through innovative medicines'.

The Strathclyde Minor Groove Binder (S-MGB) platform was originally developed under the leadership of Professor Colin Suckling.  The initial S-MGB concept dates back to 2003, and has been a dedicated research priority for the University of Strathclyde since then. 

 

For the past ten years, Dr Fraser Scott and Prof. Colin Suckling, working closely with Prof. Iain Hunter, have advanced the understanding of S-MGBs to develop a 2nd generation of this drug class.

The Rostra Therapeutics team in its current form has been working together since July 2021, when commercial champion, Mr David Findlay, MBA was appointed by the University to help lead the commercialisation. David worked closely alongside Mr John Mulgrew, MBA from the Innovation and Industry Engagement directorate at the University. 

We are focused on accelerating the route to market through parallel development programmes, collaborations, and the use of accelerated regulatory routes. The 2nd generation S-MGBs have the potential to treat a variety of serious infections. Based on a clear unmet clinical need, positive data gathered to date and a viable commercial market, Rostra Therapuetic's initial focus is on developing S-MGBs to treat serious fungal infections.

stock photo hospital clinician hallway.jpg

GLOBAL incidence rates foR SERIOUS FUNGAL INFECTIONS

Screenshot 2022-02-26 at 14.26.56.png